IoT Security Rss

Internet of Things (IoT) has become a central research topic, as it incorporates various sensors and devices to interact directly with each other without human intervention, via networks. Security is of major concern when dealing with the communication of multiple devices conducting the transmission of sensitive data. As IoT technology increasingly becomes more utilized across greater fields, the need for privacy and security increases as well. This study tackles prominent IoT security methods and principles, whilst presenting two practical implementations of IoT technology from a security viewpoint.

Internet of Things (IoT) is made up of various technologies, which supports advanced services in various application domains. Security and privacy are a very important aspect for IoT application domains. These applications require data confidentiality, authenticity, integrity and access control within the IoT network. For users and things, security is achieved by enforcing the security and privacy policies. Due to the different standards and communication stacks involved in traditional security solutions, it cannot be directly applied to IoT technologies. In IoT number of interconnected devices is expected to increase tremendously hence scalability is the biggest challenge for IoT development. This survey paper presents the available security protocols at respective IoT layers. A comparison of this information is done with respective to various security aspects and research gaps are identified

This document highlights areas of elevated risk resulting from the software-enabled and connected aspects of Internet of Things technologies and their role in the physical world. It provides information on certain vulnerabilities and weaknesses, suggests solutions for common challenges, and identifies factors to consider before purchasing or using Internet of Things devices, systems, and services.

The Internet of Things is an emerging topic of technical, social, and economic significance. Consumer products, durable goods, cars and trucks, industrial and utility components, sensors, and other everyday objects are being combined with Internet connectivity and powerful data analytic capabilities that promise to transform the way we work, live, and play. Projections for the impact of IoT on the Internet and economy are impressive, with some anticipating as many as 100 billion connected IoT devices and a global economic impact of more than $11 trillion by 2025.

n the COVID-19 and post-pandemic business environment, leveraging robust Internet of Things (IoT) security risk management strategies becomes of particular importance to IoT adopters. Thus, given that no research study was found to exclusively focus on the current state of IoT security risk management strategies in organizations, this article aims to support IoT security practitioners to peer benchmark and enhance their IoT security risk management strategies. In a nutshell, this study relies on a mixed methods research methodology, and its main contribution is the determination of the current state of the IoT security risk management strategies in the surveyed organizations relative to our IoT Security Risk Management Strategy Reference Model (IoTSRM2).

Nowadays, Internet of Things (IoT) adoptions are burgeoning and deemed the lynchpin towards achieving ubiquitous connectivity. In this context, defining and leveraging robust IoT security risk management strategies are paramount for secure IoT adoptions. Thus, this study aims to support IoT adopters from any sector to formulate or reframe their IoT security risk management strategies to achieve robust strategies that effectively address IoT security issues. In a nutshell, this article relies on a mixed methods research methodology and proposes a reference model for IoT security risk management strategy. The proposed IoT security risk management strategy reference model (IoTSRM2) relies on the 25 selected IoT security best practices which are outlined using a proposed taxonomic hierarchy, and on the proposed three-phased methodology that consists of nine steps and outputs. The main contribution of this work is the proposed IoTSRM2 which consists of six domains, 16 objectives, and 30 prioritized controls. Furthermore, prior to providing the related work, this article provides a critical evaluation of selected informative references of IoTSRM2 based on their percentage-wise linkage to the IoTSRM2 domains and to the entire IoTSRM2. The findings of the critical evaluation illustrate, inter alia, the selected informative references that are the top three most and least linked to the entire IoTSRM2.

Abstract— Internet of things technology is delivering new experiences to the people by connecting devices, people and networks together. Examples include smart grid, smart health, smart home, smart offices, smart manufacturing, e-commerce, egovernance and smart industrial control. More and more devices are connecting every day resulting in more security threats and issues.

The internet of things (IoT) is a technology that has the capacity toThe internet of things (IoT) is a technology that has the capacity torevolutionise the way that we live, in sectors ranging from transportto health, from entertainment to our interactions with government.This fantastic opportunity also presents a number of significantchallenges. The growth in the number of devices and the speedof that growth presents challenges to our security and freedomsas we battle to develop policies, standards, and governance thatshape this development without stifling innovation. This paperdiscusses the evolution of the IoT, its various definitions, andsome of its key application areas. Security and privacyconsiderations and challenges that lie ahead are discussed bothgenerally and in the context of these applications.

Internet of things technology is delivering new experiences to the people by connecting devices, people and networks together. Examples include smart grid, smart health, smart home, smart offices, smart manufacturing, e-commerce, e-governance and smart industrial control. More and more devices are connecting every day resulting in more security threats and issues. We need a robust IoT security model to support resource constrained IoT devices, and end to end security. In this paper, we have discussed the entities involved in providing IoT based services for example IoT devices, applications and networks.

In recent years, there has been a rapid uptake of converging both Information Technology (IT) and Operational Technology (OT) environments as organisations seek to improve their bottom line by reducing costs [25]. Now with the evolving world of connected Internet of Things (IoT), these same businesses are fast identifying the new global advantages that IoT may bring to international and competitive markets. The resources and mining industry in Western Australian (WA) is a case in point.

With the proliferation of IoT devices in the enterprise, managing third-party risks to sensitive and confidential data has become a herculean task. As revealed in The Second Annual Study on the Internet of Things (IoT): A New Era of Third-Party Risk, companies are deeply concerned that failure to prevent a data breach or cyber attack due to an unsecured IoT device would have catastrophic consequences.

The Internet of Things is an emerging topic of technical, social, and economic significance. Consumer products, durable goods, cars and trucks, industrial and utility components, sensors, and other everyday objects are being combined with Internet connectivity and powerful data analytic capabilities that promise to transform the way we work, live, and play. Projections for the impact of IoT on the Internet and economy are impressive, with some anticipating as many as 100 billion connected IoT devices and a global economic impact of more than $11 trillion by 2025.

The cloud computing and the Internet of things are tightly coupled with each other . The rapid growth of the Internet of Things (IoT) and the development of technologies created a widespread connection of “things”. This results in the product ion of large amounts of data which needs to be stored, processed and accessed. Cloud computing is a paradigm for big data storage and analytics while the Internet of Things is exciting on its own that the real innovation will come from combining it with cloud computing . This can enable sensing services and powerful processing of sensing data stream. More things are being connected to address a growing range of business needs. In fact, by the year 2020, more than 50 billion things will connect to the Internet seven times our human population.

Today internet techno$ogy ha)e reached the position in hich cybercrime is sophisticated it seems almost impossible to present the majors o- security in the cyberspace have increase drastically since the sophistication o- cybercrime is a concern to many organisations( the emphasis is not on how an organisation responds once it has been breached. Research report submitted by Lebohang Mabotja

This technical report seeks to address the issue of cyber security. It explores the increasing
threats and challenges affecting the cyber world. The growth of global Internet usage has
undoubtedly increased internet-based services, as well as improved information sharing and
communications. Such drastic changes have rendered the existing systems helpless in
addressing the ever-evolving threats. The paper addresses these threats, challenges, and
potential risks for purposes of informing the industry on the effectiveness of the preexisting
countermeasures

ABSTRACT: We talk about how to best protect Australia against cyberterrorist attacks of the type in which
the offenders use a computer to attack or in which the offenders attack computers. Our concern is phenomena
like Stuxnet and Ransomware, but also any attack that has not yet happened, as for our official records, so say
hacking of satellite and use of its allowances to burn people alive to death. We talk about the basics, which
could be the advice of FireEye, and we talk about the sophisticated, which could be what is not yet printed. We
worry about actions that could be considered part of the intelligence system, so things that demand detailed
study of the past and systemic plus organised collection of data in the present. We do not talk about how to deal
with Acts of War: Only about how to protect our systems to best so that we do not get those happening via
computer or from a computer.

Abstract Cybersecurity Dynamics is new concept that aims to achieve the modeling, analysis, quantification, and management of cybersecurity from a holistic perspective, rather than from a building-blocks perspective. It is centered at modeling and analyzing the attack-defense interactions in cyberspace, which cause a “natural” phenomenon— the evolution of the global cybersecurity state. In this Chapter, we systematically introduce and review the Cybersecurity Dynamics foundation for the Science of Cybersecurity. We review the core concepts, technical approaches, research axes, and results that have been obtained in this endeavor. We outline a research roadmap towards the ultimate research goal, including a systematic set of technical barriers.